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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to get pregnant but went directly to IUI because my husband travels a lot.


My ob gyn told me that 80% of women with thsi antibody misscarry and that it would be difficult to hold a pregnancy.

I have mild lupus. Now mild antiphospholipid anti- boderline IGM boderline positive, igg is a bit higher.

Is my chances so bleak to get pregnant and carry a full term pregnancy. Should dr's be so negative or is he just telling me how it is???

Please help, totally depressed and need some encouragement.

Just had an IUI done and am totally stressed out even though I should be relaxing

Savvy
 

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Savvy, There is a very good chance of a successful pregnancy,but you need good medical support and monitoring. Are you in the UK?
At St. Thomas; Lupus Unit in London there is a whole gallery of photos of healthy babies born to Mums with Lupus and/ or APS.
x Lola
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks for the response

Thanks Lola,

I needed to hear some positive feedback after my dr's negative remarks.

The thing is I am really lucky cause my lupus has been in remission for 4 years or more. My anti Phil antibodies were high and are now low. My ANA has been negative for a long time. I have been really positive, then he says things like

"well with the anti philo antibodies, the egg may not be able to implant"

&

"80% of women with this condition have misscarriages".

Also I have a question? Just cause I have the antibodies, does that mean I have the syndrome? My blood has clotting factors is what the test means? That definitely signifies a problem???

Thanks

Savvy
 

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Hi there,

I do not think we have met before so nice to meet you. Are you in the UK or the USA?????

I have Lupus and APS and my son was full term, 10 lbs 5 1/2 ounces of pure joy. He was healthy as a horse.

You CAN ABSOLUTELY have a full term healthy pregnancy if your under doctors care and on meds to help the pregnancy along.

Only GOD knows what our future holds. In my humble opinion this doctor or any doctor for that matter do not know weather or not you will be successful with a full term pregnancy.

I will tell you to Google APS,... read, read, read as knowledge is power. Learn all you can about YOUR disease and with this you will find that you will not stress as much.

There is criteria with APS. The fact that you have a positive antibody is indicative of the disease, however, you must meet certain criteria in order to be diagnosed with APS.

Just having the antibody does not mean you have APS. Take a deep breath and gain knowledge of APS. Trust me you will feel better knowing what your dealing with.

Also, join a forum dealing with APS too where you can find all you need to know about the disease. A good one is www.apsforum.com
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks karen

I live in the USA, california. We have the best hospitals here in the bay area. I think I will seek out a good physician at standford.

I'm embarrassed to say that I acutally have done a lot of reading up on APS but still don't understand it:blush:

Perhaps I will try to read up again without panick attacks:(

Thanks again, I will sleep good tonight. LAst night was a little ancy

Savvy
 

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Hello Savvy,

I'm afraid I don't know an awful lot about this as I had my children pre illness and pre diagnosis but I do know that lots of people here with both lupus and APS have had successful pregnancys and that includes some whose health was a lot less stable than yours seems to be for the moment.

To be perfectly honest, I would look into seeing if you can see another OB/gyne and gettign asecond opinion. If you are going to embark on this journey you need someone supporting you, not depressing you and filling you with more fears than one already has when pregnant. There are also certain clinics that also help people with lupus in pregnancy. In other words they are specialised and know about the disease. Your rheumy may know someone who would be more up on the disease and the treatment options.

I'm sure someone will be along soon with more concrete information on this and maybe some suggestions of where you can find out more about pregnancy in people with APS.

All I know is that it IS possible and you certainly shouldn't give up hope too quickly!

Katharine
 

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Okay, you haven't understood information so far, no worries. Probably a good site for you is the Hughes syndrome association site. This is a reputable site in the UK with info. from Prof. Hughes. I think you will be able to understand that more easily. I am glad your lupus symptoms have been so mild.
x Lola
 

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Hi Savvy,

If you've never had a previous miscariage or stillbirth, or a dvt or other clot, then there is a good chance you won't have any problemsa at all. Many doctors would reccomend you be on a baby asprin (80mg) from beginning to try to concieve onwards just in case. If you do have a miscarriage, then it would be advisable to add heparin to the med list with the next pregnancy. This will increase the chances of success to about 70% (so much better than just 10 to 20% without treatment. Talk to your doctor about how they want to manage it. I can understand not wanting to treat you with heparin if you have never had a clinical problem from the antibodies, as they do not cause problems for everyone, and the heparin shots are no fun and have their own risks.

So, good luck, and I hope it happens quickly for you:p

X C X
 

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I was in a similar position to yours when I decided to get pregnant except my lupus was not in complete remission. I had moderately high levels of anti-cardiolipin antibodies, but had never had a serious clotting event due to them. I had been on a low dose aspirin due to some thrombophlebitis and the positive ACL blood tests - and my high risk OB team decided to keep me on that through my pregnancy. I had a very healthy full term baby girl ;)

With treatment, 70-80% of women with APS (which you may not actually officially have since you have not had a clotting event) will carry a baby to term. So your chances are indeed good. You should have a high risk OB to monitor you once you get pregnant, and you will have more frequent monitoring during the pregnancy.

Keep in mind that a fairly large percentage of the general population of women will miscarry early at least once in their lives due to unknown reasons - and the 70-80% figure becomes very nearly that of healthy women!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thank you, thank you

To all of you for your positive support. Lola, I read the website you mentioned and I think I am starting to understand better. It seems like my mind goes blank when it comes to science or medicine.

I'm pretty good with numbers though:lol:. I'll ask more questions if need be.

THanks again

Savvy
 

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Savvy,

Your not alone when it comes to not being able to understand medical stuff so please do not be embarrassed by this.

Glad your able to understand a little more. When I go on Google and just cant seem to comprehend things I come here and these wonderful folks at this board break it down in layman terms for me.

One of the many reasons I am in love with this board and the support I get here.
 
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