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I just read in another post someone who was told they had 'sky high' blood pressure at 142 systolic. Its amazing how differently GPs look at blood pressure. Mine has been steadily going up over the last couple of years. Used to always be around 110 - 120 systolic. Now it is always around or just over 140 when GP tests and on occasions has been up to 160. But GP isn't doing anything about it except checking it when I make a point of asking him to do so. While it sits at around 140 he is happy to leave it. Should I be insisting on him doing more? I also almost always have a trace of protein in urine samples, and occasionally 1+. Again GP says its not significant as urine samples have been taken when I have infection and infection can cause protein leakage. But, now I'm wondering whether the rise in blood pressure combined with low level protein leakage into urine should be being taken more seriously?

BTW I don't have a lupus diagnosis as blood tests have always been negative. I do have malar rash, livedo reticularis, achy joints, sicca syndrome (bone dry shirmers test), what feels like costochondritis, coeliac disease (another autoimmune disorder), other gastro problems, and a big family history of autoimmune disorders including mother with lupus, RA and sjogrens. I also have considerable neurological symptoms. I take muscle relaxants (baclofen and diazepam), metoclopramide (reglan?), and NSAIDs.
 

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What constitutes high blood pressure has changed over the years. If yours is usually at the 140 over ? point, that's a little lower than the brink of when a doctor might start thinking about actually treating it. Few physicians would call a 140 systolic reading as sky high. The times when it reached 160 - was that when you were in a lot of pain by chance? Higher blood pressure is common just due to high amount of pain. I know my blood pressure tends to run low, but has been as high as 160 over 100 when I was in a lot of pain (in ER following an injury for example!).

Your doctor is probably right about protein being in the urine being due to the bladder infection brewing. Have you ever had your urine tested when there are no signs/symptoms of a bladder infection? Such as when you've seen the rheumy as a matter of routine? What does it show then?

There is a connection between high blood pressure and kidney problems, so I can understand your concern with the protein and the increasing blood pressure. This is definitely a question to ask your rheumy the next time you go... I have had trace to +1 protein appear a few times now, but no high blood pressure, and my rheumy's response has been to place me on an extremely low dose of enalapril to protect my kidneys. In my case, there has never been a bladder infection though.

Hope this helps!
 

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Hi there

I also have high blood pressure and am currently on three different medications to control it. At the moment its about normal for me to have a BP of 135/100. (thats with the meds). I am, however, overweight and do very little exercise. Pre meds it would have been usual for me to have a BP measurement of 150+/125 (which was NOT good)

My understanding is that the diastolic number is the one to watch more closely in those under about the age of 55. I understand in older people a high systolic number is more common. However a systolic of 160 would concern me.

Assessing whether one has hypertension that needs treatment is very much dependent on other factors like what is considered normal for the person, what age they are, etc etc.. By the way, the diastolic number is the measurement that reflects the pressure of your heart in between beats (at rest) whereas the systolic measures the pressure of the heart when its actually pumping. Some people say that the greater the difference between the two the greater the chances of negative outcomes.

Im no expert on this. I have just done a bit of research over the years because I have had hypertension on and off during periods of my life.

When your GP next takes your BP find out both numbers and if the diastolic is also high ask him directly if he thinks your BP needs further investigation like a 24 hour monitor for example. Very often all it needs are diet changes and exercise etc to get it within an acceptable range.

I always think its wise to keep a good eye on the BP. If you are concerned I think its right that you should ask your doctor more about it and ask him what is acceptable 'norms' for your age, profile, etc. I ended up buying a home BP monitor because I wanted to establish if there was a pattern or whether it was just 'white coat syndrome' raising my BP at the docs. It was a good investment because I was able to establish that my BP was high on waking as well as during the day, etc. That eventually made the doc sit up and take notice.

Hope you get it sorted
Luv n stuff
Joan:rose:
 
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