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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've not yet been diagnosed but am in the process of arming myself with lots of information for a return visit to my GP next week. Could anyone please advise whether my elevated cholesterol and cortisol readings could be due to lupus? I was advised that the cortisol was probably due to stress. With regard to the cholesterol, I was required to keep a food diary for a month and my GP concurred that my diet was not the cause. Saying that, the issue has since been brushed under the carpet (along with everything else!) and I'm none the wiser. Additionally, I have low ferritin.....possibly another indicator?

......and just remembered, a year or so back had an abnormal liver function reading, but again this was simply ignored.
 

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If I'm remembering correctly, high cortisol can contribute to high cholesterol all by itself. This is one reason why people with lupus try to avoid staying on prednisone for the long term as it contributes to development of other problems.

High cholesterol is incredibly common in the general population, and the diet is often not responsible. This finding would not be considered really in a lupus diagnosis. Diet and exercise can improve the values somewhat (and exercise will increase the good cholesterol) but most people with high cholesterol find it is simply their own liver making too much for whatever reason (genetics seems most likely but surely there are other reasons). I think a completely vegetarian diet is the most likely to improve too high of a cholesterol value, but many will find that hard to live with!

Low ferritin usually means you need more iron in your diet as your iron stores are low. Supplementation or eating some red meat 2 or 3 times a week can usually cure that problem.

So none of these would likely help you in a search for an autoimmune answer to your health problems. I hope something can be done for you soon - it is so frustrating to feel so ill and have no answers and no help. Take care and keep on trying to find out what is causing these symptoms...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Maia;523104 said:
If I'm remembering correctly, high cortisol can contribute to high cholesterol all by itself. This is one reason why people with lupus try to avoid staying on prednisone for the long term as it contributes to development of other problems.

High cholesterol is incredibly common in the general population, and the diet is often not responsible. This finding would not be considered really in a lupus diagnosis. Diet and exercise can improve the values somewhat (and exercise will increase the good cholesterol) but most people with high cholesterol find it is simply their own liver making too much for whatever reason (genetics seems most likely but surely there are other reasons). I think a completely vegetarian diet is the most likely to improve too high of a cholesterol value, but many will find that hard to live with!

Low ferritin usually means you need more iron in your diet as your iron stores are low. Supplementation or eating some red meat 2 or 3 times a week can usually cure that problem.

So none of these would likely help you in a search for an autoimmune answer to your health problems. I hope something can be done for you soon - it is so frustrating to feel so ill and have no answers and no help. Take care and keep on trying to find out what is causing these symptoms...
Thanks for the info Maia. I'm just trying to etablish the important factors that need to be highlighted to my GP when I next visit.
 
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