TheLupusSite.com banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My rheumatologist diagnosed me with Heberden and Bouchard nodes a couple of years ago (no x-rays were done). I thought Heberden and Bouchard nodes were permanent bony changes but they are completely gone. Can anyone tell me if they are permanent or can go away?

If they are permanent, then the swelling was due to something else and it's important for me to point this out to my rheumatologist.


Barb
 

·
Pollianna
Joined
·
485 Posts
Hi barb, I have an appointment with the proffessor of genetic dermatology on 23 april. I will ask him if that will be any good to you?. I have a rare genetic disorder which gives me hyperkeratosis on my hands and feet. I also have herbertons and buchard sp? nodes but have had them all of my life I think. My Rheumy wants me to see this chap to get the name for my genetic condition, I presume to see if there are any possible autoimmune things that come with it

poor show they didn't do xrays, first thing my guy did was xray my hands and feet
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Pollianna,

If you wouldn't mind asking, that would be great.

Thank you so much for offering!

Barb
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
11,405 Posts
Hi Barb,

Here is a definition I found.

Bouchard's nodes are hard, bony outgrowths or gelatinous cysts on the proximal interphalangeal joints (the middle joints of fingers or toes.) They are a sign of osteoarthritis, and are caused by formation of calcific spurs of the articular (joint) cartilage.
Bouchard's nodes are comparable in presentation to Heberden's nodes, similar osteoarthritic growths on the distal interphalangeal joints, but are significantly less common.

I also found a picture to at this link....
http://www.webmd.com/hw-popup/heberdens-and-bouchards-nodes

I hope this helps you.
Take care,
Lyn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Lyn,

Nothing states whether the nodes are permanent or whether they can dissolve over time. That is the specific information I need to know but can't find, unless I'm overlooking it.

Barb
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
11,405 Posts
I have been trying to find that information.

Facts About Heberden's and Bouchard's Nodes
These bony growths occur at the joint at the end of the finger (Heberden’s) and in the middle finger joint (Bouchard’s). They most frequently occur in women over forty and may run in families. Most are painless and grow gradually, but can appear suddenly causing redness and pain in the affected area. They may be confined to one finger or appear on several. While their appearance may be upsetting, these nodes are not progressive and don’t interfere with daily activities.
Cartilage deterioration can cause other deformations of the fingers and hands that can be both painful and detrimental to daily functioning.
Hope this one helps.
Lyn
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hi Lyn,

I no longer think that is what I had because they are completely gone now. An x-ray of my right hand was done last summer by an orthopeodic surgeon to help diagnose de Quervain's tenosynovitis. I am going to ask for a copy of it plus the report. Hopefully that will help.

Thanks for the info.

Barb
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top