TheLupusSite.com banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My father was diagnosed with skin lupus about 10 yrs ago. I was tested (blood) after several miscarriages about 6 years ago. My Doctor told me my tests were negative. I'm not sure the exact tests he did, although they were blood tests.
I recently gave birth a few weeks ago. Since the birth of the baby I have had severe chest pain and arthritic type symptoms in my fingers, wrists and knees. I am scared these could be symptoms of lupus. I also have a long history of skin rashes (eczema) and skin reactions to the sun. Should I get tested again since the tests returned negative 6 years ago, are tests valid for life? Can lupus appear at any time even after you've tested negative in the past?
Thank you for any information you might have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,800 Posts
Hello and welcome :)

Yes, you should get tested again especially as you seem to be experiencing skin problems, joint pain and photosensitivity. The first blood test that would usually be carried out is ANA (a kind of auto-immune disease screening test). It can be negative for many years and then become positive. It can also increase over time (not especially linked to disease activity but the higher the titre, the more likely lupus is).

Another test, which may be the one you had is the confusingly called "lupus anticoagulant" which isn't a lupus test but a test for APS (anti-phospholipid syndrome). This can go hand in hand with lupus or be a stand-alone disease and is, indeed something that can lead to problems during pregnancy as well as various other symptoms including headaches, TIAs, DVTs and so on.

As well as asking for blood tests to be done, it might well be worthwhile getting a referral to a rheumy that specalises in lupus.

You will find a list of the classification criteria at this link. It might help you to see if there are symptoms there that fit with what you're experiencing.

http://www.thelupussite.com/forum/showthread.php?t=33123

Just one point. Although there is a genetic element to lupus it is not, strictly speaking, hereditary. Children of lupus patients will simply have a slightly higher chance (5-10% more) of having lupus than the general population.

Tell us if anything in that list rings any bells and don't hesitate to ask any questions you may have :)

bye for now,
Katharine
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top