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Discussion Starter #1
Back again to pick the brains of the people here who have provided me with so much knowledge as I make my way towards understanding this disease better.

OK, so now there is a test called ANA Direct that my Rheumatologist orders instead of the original ana test.

Does anyone know what the positive means now that it is not shown with a pattern or in a titer form?

In a positive result, greater then 120, is the higher the number indicitive of a more severe case of Lupus???

I don't think I will ever fully understand all there is to know.

Thanks for any help or insight that can be provided here.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Lazylegs,

Thanks for posting the link but I believe that is for a anticoagulant test.

The one I am speaking of is called a ANA Direct test.

I am finding it through google yet I am not able to find a answer to my question.

Thanks again and I will keep looking.:wink2:
 

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Hello Karol

Here is a copy of a post in the archives which explains the ANA Direct test

jewels
07-17-2005, 07:38 PM


ANA Direct (ANA-D) is a new test that LabCorp has developed. Instead of the old methods of diluting the blood till they can no longer see the antibodies (1:80, 1:160, etc) this new tests allows them to "count" the antibodies in the blood sample. Normal ranges are 0-120. I contacted The American Society for Laboratory Science and asked for their assistance because I had this test and the results but my doctor could not tell me anything other than they were high. I wanted to know how to compare to the old ANA tests and what did my result of 1,075 indicate. I'll post their reply to me below.

This info is from LabCorp's web site regarding their test:
LabCorp converted to atechnology for antinuclear antibody (ANA) testing that providesmore objective, higher quality results than traditional methodolo-gies. The new technology provides a direct measurement of autoan-tibodies relevant to ANA testing from a single patient sample. Thepresence of characterized autoantibodies in conjunction with a pos-itive ANA result and symptomatology can have far greater clinicalsignificance than an uncharacterized ANA result alone, thereby pos-itively affecting patient care.

Here is the reply I received from ASLS:
Dear Julie,

Thank you for contacting the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science consumer web site with your question concerning your ANA test results. Your ANA test result is very high; your results are in U/mL units while some ANA test results are expressed as titers. Like many laboratory tests, different methods have different normal or expected ranges and the test result units may vary with the method. Your physician will look at your ANA test result relative to the expected range for the test method you had done to interpret your results. High ANA titers (>1:160) or high ANA test results in other units like U/mL are, in general, significant disease indicators. While ANA tests are diagnostically important, test results must be always be interpreted in the context of the clinical symptoms and presentation of the patient.

To compare ANA test results provided in different units (titers vs. U/mL e.g.), the results are looked at for clinical significance in the context of the patient's history, etc. High results by one test method should be high by another test method; low test results the same thing.

Hope this all helps you have more understanding regarding the ANA Direct blood tests.

Julie
I haven't heard that ANA levels reflect either disease activity, or severity. The use of the ANA is primarily in diagnosis and sometimes it might indicate how well treatment is succeeding, all depending on the individual's symptoms and other test results. Interpretation of ANA results by whatever method also depends on patient history, symptoms, examination and other test results.

Cheers
Clare
 

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Thanks for posting the link but I believe that is for a anticoagulant test.
Just to mention that this appears to be a test for antibodies to red blood cells that can indicate hemolytic anemia

:)
Clare
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Clare.

So I guess the higher the number does not correlate with how sick you are or how bad you may be flaring at the time your blood was drawn.

This was helpful and I thank you.:wink2:
 

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It's the same as with the titre method... where a higher titre does not mean you have more disease activity. However, the higher the value or titre, the more likely the result is a true positive and the more likely an autoimmune disease is responsible for the result.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Maia.

It makes sense the higher the number the increased likelihood that you truly have something auto immune going on.
 

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To be nitpicky, the higher the number the more likely it is to be an autoimmune inflammatory connective tissue disease like lupus rather than for example autoimmune thyroid disease or MS or fibro or any of the diseases and conditions that can be found with a slightly elevated ANA.

:)
Clare
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hey Clare,

That is not nitpicky at all.:lol::lol:

That is just more added great information.

Thank you very much.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank You Lily for the link you have provided to me.

I appreciate your help and the knowledge you pass along to others.:wink2:

I looked at the link and forgot that we even had this conversation AND that I was the one who started the thread. :)

Gotta love having brain fog.
 
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