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Hi, a question for my learned friends! My very highly qualified homeopath suggested to me that it has been known for some time within her profession that those genetically susceptible to TB are also susceptible to Lupus. Now she went on to state that TB was often found in higher numbers in certain areas geographically... I felt I had no link to lupus, my mother was adopted, but her mum was an underage irish schoolgirl who came over here to have the baby and gave her up for adoption. The homeopath said there were areas in Ireland that had high TB rates and I could be genetically linked to those areas.... ANYWAY the strange thing is that before this discussion she had no way of knowing my sister had TB at the age of 3, she made it, just... so was very lucky as treatments were scarce at that time...
Wondered if any of you have any thoughts or comments, it intrigues me!:)
Thanks,
Claire
 

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Hi,
My personal opinion is that this is a strange thing for a 'highly qualified person' to say.
TB is not genetic. Nor does it have a genetic componant. It is infective from the Tubercule Bacillus.
In the 1800's it was rife in this country and Ireland and appeared in families because it was spread by coughing between people living close together.......often in inhospitable conditions.
TB is currently rampant amongst HIV infected people whose immune systems are compromised. Again..not genetic...infective.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No, she didn't say it was genetic... but that certain people are more susceptible and that is why certain geographic areas have higher incidence than others. My sister actually caught it from an irish cleaner who used to help my mum clean the house so I realise it is infective. The genetic component came from a link to the geographical areas. I know that even in the 1980s there were certain parts of London linked to TB, of course some were due to influx of immigrants carrying it, but some areas were not explainable and health workers were quite surprised by the figures. I guess the question is more that is the immune system more compromised in these areas for any other reason than housing, poor healthcare and sanitation etc. Are some peoples immune systems weaker than others due to genetics? Just a thought.
 

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Hmm that's a new one on me. I actually had a severe case of TB and flatlined twice as a baby. I was hospitalized for 18months. I believe that my problems stem from the radical treatment for TB revving up my immune system to the point where it couldn't stop. I have never had much energy and as a child and young adult slept like the dead, literally couldn't be roused. I thought it was mild narcolepsy, now i think it was Lupus
 

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Hi Claire

You got me googling :hehe:... I found something that might interest you about the possibility of human gene variants and susceptibility to TB.

http://www.bio-medicine.org/medicin...-Be-Due-To-Three-Human-Gene-Variants-11606-1/

I still havent found anything that might link these specific gene variants to those gene variants that were found to increase the risk of developing Lupus. Here's a link to the Lupus gene research which might interest you.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071202155309.htm

Its all way over my head but if it floats your boat I will let you delve into the research and come up with some hypothesis!! :hehe:

Go girl go......

Luv n stuff
Joan:rose:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you so much Joan, that was really helpful. I will now go back to the homeopath and find out more as to what exactly they know/believe. I know she does alot of training of students etc and is knowledgeable, so will enjoy picking her brains, it may be nothing, but I am curious and as my husband is wrapping me up in cotton wool and not allowing me back to my post in the family business yet I can spend some time investigating. It is a pity my daughter is studying forensic science and not genetics!!!:) I will let you know how I get on!
Claire X
 

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I found this facinating...did i spell that correct !

My dad died at 44 from "Lung Cancer"...

It was only a few years ago when my Aunt Mentioned he had TB...i questioned it but it was hushed up...when i asked my aunt about it she said she must have got it wrong.....sooooo does make you wonder...
 

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Claire

Here's another link. Its only an abstract and you would have to sign up to get the full text though. Not sure who is 'allowed' to sign up. You probably have to be in a research organisation.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117879016/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0

And here's a more interesting one published online last month from Trinity College Dublin. It focuses on genetic variations of Toll-Like Receptors (TLR's) and their link to disease susceptibility and cites both TB and SLE.

http://content.karger.com/ProdukteD...t&ArtikelNr=200774&Ausgabe=0&ProduktNr=234234

Happy reading :hehe: Check out the bibliography on the last one as well. Might be interesting research ;)

Cheers
Joan:rose:
 

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Hi All

I wonder whether perhaps there has been some misunderstanding here. TB of the skin is called "lupus vulgaris". This is not related to the connective tissue diseases lupus erythematosus and discoid lupus etc..

According to Wikipedia:

"The term "lupus" to describe an ulcerative skin disease dates to the late thirteenth century, though it was not until the mid-nineteenth that two specific skin diseases were classified as Lupus erythematosus and Lupus vulgaris. The term "lupus" may derive from the rapacity and virulence of the disease; a 1590 work described it as "a malignant ulcer quickly consuming the neather parts; ... very hungry like unto a woolfe"."

Merle
 
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