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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,
just wanted to share some good news.I decided to try a pilates class as I'm not up to going to the gym or swimming(too cold!).On the night I felt so tired I was regretting signing up but went along anyway.Having scoured my wardrobe,unsuccessfully,for something remotely sporty to wear,I resigned myself to wearing black to hide my beer gut.
Anyway,I soon found out that this was my ideal class!spend most of your time lying down...excellent:) very low level exercises.The next day my muscles ached,but I had my first day free of joint pain for years:wink2: what a result.The pain didn't start again until the evening so I'm definitely going to try to keep it up(paid in advance and too expensive to stop anyway:rotfl: )
Just had to share,I had forgotten what it was like to be painfree,
Julsie
 

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Hey Julsie!

I had to actually google that as I had never heard of it before. Maybe they don't have it here, or they call it something else but it sounds great - just what I need, if only they had it !!!

I'm keeping up with the gentle gym. I'm doing ok except some exercises where the trainer really saw just how painful some things could be. I'm glad to say he didn't even try to insist :)

Katharine
 

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Hi Julsie,

Good for you! I too have started pilates, my physio is very keen for me to get back to some form of exercise since my flare. Before Christmas I was back running and doing all sorts but I'm just not up to it now. I ache quite badly the day after Pilates then feel better the day after that. The teacher is aware of my condition so keeps an eye on me.

Don't worry about looking like a goddess - I wear Hubby's t-shirts. :eek:

Katharine - Pilates is similar to yoga. It concentrates on the alignment of the spine, shoulders, knees and hips. I find it more regimented than yoga which works the entire body equally, whereas pilates is targeting the core muscles (pelvic, lower back, abdomen) to improve posture.

Hugz,

Pam xxx
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi Katharine,
I know you can get books on it,probably just as good.I tried the gym,but I was just so tired before I started.The last time I went,I couldn't manage 2 mins on the treadmill,so I decided to call it a day.
Pam,it was my physio that suggested it for my bad neck and the woman who teaches it is a physio so it's quite nice.I used to run years ago but I can't now because of breathlessness and knee pain.I loved it.I used to be a swimmer too and find it hard to believe I could manage over a hundred lengths in a training session.Makes me laugh really that the docs say there is nothing wrong when I struggle to get up the stairs.
I'm pleased that I've found something I can do.Had a great nights sleep after ,too!:) I had to wear my husband's T-shirt aswell,I'm too fat to get into mine!:blush:
Julsie
 

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Thanks for all that info ladies :)

I'm not doing any cardio work yet at the gym. I have just started with gentle weights for all different parts of the body. When I say weights, it's a slight exaggeration as with many machines I work with the minimum "weight" of 5kg.

I do hope to work up to the cardio but having gone from absolutely no exercise to some, I decided to give it a couple of weeks and not go pushing myself too hard and suffering a setback.

keep up the good work,
Katharine
 

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I would love to try Pilates but have never managed to find a class that runs between 5 and 8pm. Around my way they are either late at night (after 9.30pm when I'm generally asleep) or during the morning when I can't get child care without paying a fortune!!

I've been told by someone in the medical proffession that Thai Chi is good as well!

Love,

Lesley
 

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Hi again,

I'm not at all in the medical profession but yes, Tai Chi is excellent. Extremely good for posture, very gentle and also works on energy in your body so can help a lot with tiredness and lack of energy.

I practice(d) Aikido and our "teacher" also did Tai Chi, unfortunately he is a long way away so I don't attend the classes.

It may sound ridiculous but any martial art which works on energy is very beneficial for giving energy. In aikido you use your adversary's energy and it really does give YOU energy. When I'm feeling roughly OK, if I can practice in the morning then I'm set up for the day.

The advantage of Tai Chi is that, once you know a few movements, you can do those yourself at home in between classes as you don't need someone else to practice. Early in the morning while still in pyjamas is great :)

Tai Chi is also very calming, great for breathing and teaches you how to destress very well.

Katharine
 

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Hi all

Just wanted to agree with benefits of Pilates.

I only went twice on account of being a bit lazy and lessons at a difficult time.

I have just started lyengar yoga in the evenings. The small group in our session have all got something the matter with them, so it's a special therapuetic class and we each follow a different program designed only for ourselves. It's a tiny group.

The teacher has been practicing yoga for 30 years and has been to india many times to complete courses himself.

I have never been so impressed with the individual attention given by any practitioner so far.

He observes us all very closely as we go through our programs (and tells us off a bit if we are not correctly positioned).

I now realise that many other people teaching yoga are not always that good. Can cause you to injure yourself.

I also find it very hard to get my head round the fact that if he gives me an exercise to 'increase my energy levels' (maaaaaan) it actaully works. Shows how cynical I had become, I suppose.

He has lots of strong rings attached to walls and the ceiling that have ropes attached. Before you get excited, they are not for kinky use.

Sometimes you might be hanging upside down for a few minutes (let me tell you how good a bad back feels after this) and he even managed to support me into a type of shoulder stand over a chair last week. Did not think my body would move like that, but once in position, supported with special pads, I was just sooo comfortable.

As soon as I told him about my problems with my right arm, he gently put my arm into a positon that stopped the pins and needles, then cave me a few exercises to improve my posture. Yes guys - that simple. I got pain killers and the offer of antidepressants from the medical profession.

Don't get me wrong - thank goodness for the medical profession, but sometimes a different pair of eeyes is useful.
 

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ALWIN;496777 said:
He has lots of strong rings attached to walls and the ceiling that have ropes attached. Before you get excited, they are not for kinky use.
Too funny Alwin :rotfl:

I have to agree that you have to be careful selecting the right class and teacher. I did a yoga class at my old work and the lady was wonderful. She was in her 60's and was also a therapist to dispraxic children. She often recognised weaknesses before you got a chance to tell her. At that time I had no clue I had lupus but she did spot a weakness in my right arm.

I then tried a class at my new place of work and it was too fast paced and jerky - it just didn't feel right to me or the rest of the class.

It sounds like you've found a gem of a teacher...wish I could go too! :hehe:

Hugz,

Pam xxx
 
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