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Lily


This thread contains some very good information. When I was working in the hospital as a nurse, there would be times that patients would come in completely worked up because they just knew that they had *insert illness*. Sometimes the patient may be correct with their diagnosis and other times, they completely missed the mark. I found this group difficult to treat, as it was hard to convince them that they were not sick or at least not sick with that particular illness. The other group of patients that I found the most challenging were the ones that knew what they had, yet continued not to make good life choices either thru exercise, medication and/or healthy living. They would get so mad at you and the doc because you were not "fixing" them. I always found it difficult to help those that didn't want to help themselves. Now when I say that, I mean it was hard to convince them that they might need a lifestyle change. Some of them would tell you that their grandparents, friends, etc have done *insert bad habit* for years and THEY were fine. One that always got me was the patient who came into my unit with a heartattack and you found that they were smoking, eating almost every meal out and from a grease pit and led a sedentary lifestyle. You would try to explain to them that they need to modify a few things so it wouldn't happen again. They just KNEW you were against smoking, calling them lazy and that we had no clue what is meant to have such a hectic lifestyle. :wall: :screamin: :grrr: .

Trying to educate the patient was always another challenge as they knew everything because their friend went thru it, family member dies from it or they read it on the internet. I feel it is important for patients to be knowledgeable about their health care and their illnesses. There are some unscrupulous docs in this world and are only looking at $$$$$. HOWEVER, even though you might have read 5 different websites discussing your problem or suspected problem, does not necessarily make people completely knowledgeable. I heard many a patient argue with a doc and stating, "that is not what I read on the internet!"

I have always encouraged patients to be active in their healthcare by knowing what their illness are, their limitations, their medications, etc. I have also told them not to believe everything they read in a magazine, newspaper or on the internet. Just because it is in print, doesn't necessarily make it true.


Nancy
 

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yay, at last, an article on the perils of self diagnosis.

If I read something on the internet which may be of interest to my own case, I always begin with 'what do you think about XYZ' when talking to my doctors. It is a partnership approach.

Also, I worry about the perils of doctor shopping to support a diagnosis that patient has self selected. If 6 doctors say no, you don't have lupus, and one says yes you do, then the one who says yes is not necessarily right. It still means that 6 out of 7 of the doctors you say don't think you have lupus, so the concern is that a person ends up being treated for the wrong disease.

thanks lily

raglet
 

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I think this is an excellent article! It reminds us that we may have the symptoms but are not a professional and can not make that call.

I also think it is a good reminder for us to use our research to better explain and communicate our symptoms to our doctor as well as being able to ask more educated questions, not that we have something just because we read it.

What a great article to post!
 

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diagnose self, you may be way off the mark

This reminds me of the time a few years ago when I made an appointment to see the nurse, thinking I had low blood pressure becsuse I had been feeling faint and dizzy.
As soon as I walked in the room and she saw me the nurse knew I was anaemic.
She did a blood test and looked at my eyelids. I go a phone call later that day and the doctor asked me to go to the hospital for a blood transfusion. I only had half the red cells I was supposed to have. I had 4 pints of blood transfused that day.
Before then I did not even know I was anaemic, but since then I have regular checks and often go on courses of iron supplements.
I now know what to look out for and know how to monitor my blood loss and when I may need a more frequent bood test.
 

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Lily, You have become my best research tool-friend,. You have either more free time than some of the rest of us, plus more patients to be on this computer, which I willingly say is my worst enemy ever. You do have a super nack for finding some of the best research sites, and I can, in no way, say how much I appreciate it, and the time that you spend doing it for all of the others on this site.
You help so many by doing what you do so very well, and I want to thank you so very, very much.
 
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